Quality of Life Comparison

COMPARED TO

If you lived in Oman instead of Uzbekistan, you would:

Health

live 1.7 years longer


In Uzbekistan, the average life expectancy is 74 years (71 years for men, 77 years for women). In Oman, that number is 76 years (74 years for men, 78 years for women).

be 62.7% more likely to be obese


In Uzbekistan, 16.6% of adults are obese. In Oman, that number is 27.0% of people.

Economy

make 6.6 times more money


Uzbekistan has a GDP per capita of $6,900, while in Oman, the GDP per capita is $45,200.

Life

be 52.8% less likely to die during childbirth


In Uzbekistan, approximately 36.0 women per 100,000 births die during labor. In Oman, 17.0 women do.

be 28.9% less likely to die during infancy


In Uzbekistan, approximately 18.0 children die before they reach the age of one. In Oman, on the other hand, 12.8 children do.

have 42.9% more children


In Uzbekistan, there are approximately 16.8 babies per 1,000 people. In Oman, there are 24.0 babies per 1,000 people.

Basic Needs

be 49.1% more likely to have internet access


In Uzbekistan, approximately 46.8% of the population has internet access. In Oman, about 69.8% do.

Expenditures

spend 37.9% less on healthcare


Uzbekistan spends 5.8% of its total GDP on healthcare. In Oman, that number is 3.6% of GDP.

Oman: At a glance

Oman is a sovereign country in Middle East, with a total land area of approximately 309,500 sq km. The inhabitants of the area of Oman have long prospered on Indian Ocean trade. In the late 18th century, a newly established sultanate in Muscat signed the first in a series of friendship treaties with Britain. Over time, Oman's dependence on British political and military advisors increased, but it never became a British colony. In 1970, QABOOS bin Said Al-Said overthrew his father, and he has since ruled as sultan. His extensive modernization program has opened the country to the outside world while preserving the longstanding close ties with the UK. Oman's moderate, independent foreign policy has sought to maintain good relations with all Middle Eastern countries. Inspired by the popular uprisings that swept the Middle East and North Africa beginning in January 2011, some Omanis began staging marches, demonstrations, and sit-ins calling mostly for more jobs and economic benefits and an end to corruption. In response to those protester demands, QABOOS in 2011 pledged to implement economic and political reforms, such as granting legislative and regulatory powers to the Majlis al-Shura and introducing unemployment benefits. Additionally, in August 2012, the Sultan announced a royal directive mandating the speedy implementation of a national job creation plan for thousands of public and private sector jobs. As part of the government's efforts to decentralize authority and allow greater citizen participation in local governance, Oman successfully conducted its first municipal council elections in December 2012. Announced by the Sultan in 2011, the municipal councils will have the power to advise the Royal Court on the needs of local districts across Oman's 11 governorates.

How big is Oman compared to Uzbekistan? See an in-depth size comparison.


The statistics on this page were calculated using the following data sources: The World Factbook.

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